What’s Your Career Plan?

I’m currently reading Gayle Laakmann’s “Cracking the Coding Interview” so I could perform better in technical interviews (and also increase my knowledge in a lot of Computer Science related topics), and one of the things that she suggests is to make a career plan. She makes an obvious (or maybe not obvious?) point that what we want to achieve in our professional lives should depend on the career plan we made for ourselves.

Here’s the snippet of what Laakmann said in her book:

Career Path: Make a plan for your career. What do you want to do 5, 10, and 15 years from now? What skills do you need to develop? Which company or position will help you get there?

Before starting at a company, devise a career plan. What would you like your career to look like? What will it take to get there?

However, if you want to run a company one day, or move up into management, you should stop and check your career plan. Is another year at your job going to help you get there? Or is it time to move? You, and only you, can decide.

That being said, here’s my current career plan. It’ll probably go through a few iterations but, I think it covers much of what I really want to do with my career.

Now
– Get an entry-level web development job, video game development job or a mobile application development job.
– Continue developing in Android, and learn Swift/Objective-C in order to develop for iOS.
– Improve in all the languages/technologies I am currently experienced in.
– Learn Ruby/Ruby on Rails, PostgreSQL, and Django.

In 5 years
– Continue improving in all the languages/technologies I’m currently experienced in.
– Continue gaining valuable experience at the job I have.
– Ship at least 1 Android application to Google Play.
– Ship at least 1 iOS application to the App Store.
– Ship at least 1 Wix application to the Wix App Store.
– Become a LinkedIn influencer.
– Generate a larger following on my blog in order to establish my web presence.

In 10 years
– Hold a Chief Technical Officer or Project Manager title at my full-time job.
– Begin serving as a mentor for fellow Computer Science majors in college.
– Ship at least 1 more Android application to Google Play.
– Ship at least 1 more iOS application to the App Store.
– Ship at least 1 more Wix applicaction to the Wix App Store.

In 15 years
– Explore through my Entrepreneurial ideas, and start a company.
– Ship an indie video game.
– Begin giving business/technical talks at Universities.

What’s your career plan? Feel free to post it on your own blog! Please reference my blog post (or whatever WordPressers do when referencing other people in their blog) if you do decide to do so!

“Swift” – Apple’s New Programming Language for iOS and OS X

Has anyone read up on what Apple unveiled at the World Wide Developer’s Conference earlier today?

The thing I was most excited about was the new “Swift” programming language. Hmmm, maybe it’s a good thing I haven’t learned Objective-C yet? I am definitely picking up on Swift right away and I’m gonna dive straight into Apple’s iBook and other documentation. I’m really excited because I want to learn how to develop iOS apps, and I could possibly get started with a start-up who is looking to jump into Swift right away. The only thing is… I’ll need a Mac to program on. Can’t really practice developing iOS apps if I don’t have one…

What do you guys think about Swift?

Article here:

http://techcrunch.com/events/wwdc-2014/

Why You’re Not Hearing Back From Start-ups on AngelList

I’ve been very active in my job search over the past few months and one of my main resources for jobs has been AngelList (www.angel.co). It’s an absolutely great resource to use when looking for start-up jobs, and I only have great things to say about it. While there’s a lot I could (and want to) say about AngelList, I’m going to focus on one topic for now: why you’re not hearing back from start-ups you expressed interest in. This will be the first in a series of articles I’d like to write about AngelList and my experience in using it. If you’d be interested in reading more later on, be sure to follow my website!

I’ve used AngelList enough to explain what I think makes a great application. In fact, I applied to 8 start-ups over the past 2 weeks using AngelList, and despite all the competition and not having a lot of work experience under my belt, I heard back from 3 of them so far. In my opinion, that’s pretty good. While I know what it’s like on the job seeker’s end to express interest in a start-up, I have seen for myself exactly what it looks like on the company’s end. Consequently, I learned how I could improve my chances at hearing back from a start-up. I compiled a list of possible reasons as to why a start-up didn’t contact you back after you expressed interest in them on AngelList. If you haven’t heard back from a start-up after 2 weeks of expressing interest, it could be for any of the following reasons:

1. They’re not hiring or using AngelList.
Plain and simple. And this could be for a few reasons: they already filled the positions they were hiring for, or they just don’t have enough funding at the moment to bring more workers aboard their ship.

2. You weren’t qualified for their job openings.
Not everyone is a perfect fit with a company, whether that be culturally or professionally. If you applied for a start-up who needs Ruby on Rails developers, but you’re lacking in Ruby on Rails (and have no work to show for it), you probably won’t be getting an e-mail or message back. The best you can do is learn and improve.

3. You didn’t explain why you’re interested in working for them.
There’s feature on AngelList where you can leave a note for the start-up, explaining when you’re interested in working for them. This feature is there for a reason. From the start-up’s point of view, the person who is in charge of their AngelList account receives an e-mail that shows a list of applicants who were interested in working for them. On that list, he/she can see who left a note for them. Most start-ups won’t waste their time (and for good reason) looking at your profile to see how you might fit in with their team. In other words, they might rely on your note to do some of their work for them. Do yourself a favor and make sure that you explain to the company why you’re interested in working for them. If you don’t explain why you’re interested in working for them, they may pass on you even if you have a fantastic resume and professional profile. And the main reason: they don’t have the time to look at your profile.

4. You didn’t follow up your interest with a resume and cover letter.
When you express interest in working for a start-up, think of that as your application. Will you ever, in your entire life, apply for a job without sending in your resume and cover letter? While a lot of start-ups will contact you even if you didn’t send in a resume/cover letter (heck, it happened to me), it’s not the ideal approach to take. You increase your chances of getting the start-up to contact you back if you send in a resume/cover letter. Many start-ups value their time and if you can spare them the time it takes to ask you for your resume/cover letter, you’re doing the start-up, as well as yourself, a ton of favors. If you don’t know where to send your resume and cover letter, check out their Careers/Jobs/Contact Us section on their website.

In summary: express interest in a start-up, explain why you’re interested, and send them your resume and cover letter.

Have you used AngelList in your job search? How many start-ups have you applied to, and how many have you heard back from! I’d love to hear any stories!